1 2 3 4 5 8

Tree nuts are inversely associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity: The Adventist Health Study-2.

Jaceldo-Siegl, K., E. Haddad, K. Oda, G.E. Fraser, J. Sabate´, 2014. Tree nuts are inversely associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity: The Adventist Health Study-2. PLoS ONE 9(1): e85133. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0085133.

Out-of-hand nut consumption is associated with improved nutrient intake and health risk markers in US children and adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004.

O'Neil, C.E., D.R. Keast, T.A. Nicklas, V.L. Fulgoni, 2012. Out-of-hand nut consumption is associated with improved nutrient intake and health risk markers in US children and adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. Nutrition Research. 32:185-194.

Nut consumption is associated with decreased health risk factors for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome in U.S. adults: NHANES 1999–2004.

O’Neil, C.E., D.R. Keast, T.A. Nicklas, V.L. Fulgoni, 2011. Nut consumption is associated with decreased health risk factors for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome in U.S. adults: NHANES 1999–2004. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. 30(6):502–510.

Tree nut phytochemicals: composition, antioxidant capacity, bioactivity, impact factors. A systematic review of almonds, Brazils, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts.

Bolling, B.W., C.-Y. O. Chen, D.L. McKay, J.B. Blumberg, 2011. Tree nut phytochemicals: composition, antioxidant capacity, bioactivity, impact factors. A systematic review of almonds, Brazils, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts. Nutrition Research Reviews 24:244–275

1 2 3 4 5 8